station
 
CALLS FOR SERVICE
2013
1133
2012
1170
2011
1184
2010
1132
2009
989
2013 CALLS BY DISTRICT
STATION 1
409
STATION 2
392
STATION 3
168
STATION 4
86
MUTUAL AID CALLS
78

To provide for the safety of life and property in the Lake Ozark Fire District by serving in a safe, compassionate and professional manner through the efforts of public education, prevention, fire suppression activities, response to medical emergencies, rescues and hazardous conditions created by man or nature and, in the spirit of the fire service, respond to the needs of the citizens and the communities that we serve by fully utilizing the resources provided by the taxpayers of the fire district.


2012 VIDEO: LOFPD responded to a reported structure fire on Cherokee Road

  2014 CALLS BY MONTH

January
127
April
July
October
February
78
May
August
November
March
June
September
December

The following is a list of requirements that must be met in order to burn:

  1. The wind must be below 10 miles per hour.
  2. Humidity must be above 30%.
  3. The temperature must be below 95 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. The fire must be attended at all times.
    The person must have a hose and rake with them to attend to the fire.
  5. You can only burn yard waste. This includes leaves, branches and untreated wood. No plastics or other hydrocarbons can be burned.
  6. The fire must be out by dark.
  7. You must call for a burn permit on the day you wish to burn. You can not call to request a permit the day before you plan to burn.
  8. When Red Flag conditions are announced by NOAA or the Missouri State Fire Marshal's office issues a statewide burn ban, these will supercede requirements 1, 2 and 3 above.
  9. Subjects are responsible for their controlled burn.
  10. Fires must be at least 25 feet away from any structure.
  11. If there are any complaints by neighbors or citizens, the fire will be extinguished by either the subject or the fire district.
BURN PERMITS : CALL 573-365-6407
Fire Danger Rating and Color Code
Description
Low (L)
(Dark Green)
Fuels do not ignite readily from small firebrands although a more intense heat source, such as lightning, may start fires in duff or punky wood. Fires in open cured grasslands may bum freely a few hours after rain, but woods fires spread slowly by creeping or smoldering, and burn in irregular fingers. There is little danger of spotting.
Moderate (M)
(Light Green or Blue)
Fires can start from most accidental causes, but with the exception of lightning fires in some areas, the number of starts is generally low. Fires in open cured grasslands will burn briskly and spread rapidly on windy days. Timber fires spread slowly to moderately fast. The average fire is of moderate intensity, although heavy concentrations of fuel, especially draped fuel, may burn hot. Short-distance spotting may occur, but is not persistent. Fires are not likely to become serious and control is relatively easy.
High (H)
(Yellow)
All fine dead fuels ignite readily and fires start easily from most causes. Unattended brush and campfires are likely to escape. Fires spread rapidly and short-distance spotting is common. High-intensity burning may develop on slopes or in concentrations of fine fuels. Fires may become serious and their control difficult unless they are attacked successfully while small.
Very High (VH)
(Orange)
Fires start easily from all causes and, immediately after ignition, spread rapidly and increase quickly in intensity. Spot fires are a constant danger. Fires burning in light fuels may quickly develop high intensity characteristics such as long-distance spotting and fire whirlwinds when they burn into heavier fuels.
Extreme (E)
(Red)
Fires start quickly, spread furiously, and burn intensely. All fires are potentially serious. Development into high intensity burning will usually be faster and occur from smaller fires than in the very high fire danger class. Direct attack is rarely possible and may be dangerous except immediately after ignition. Fires that develop headway in heavy slash or in conifer stands may be unmanageable while the extreme burning condition lasts. Under these conditions the only effective and safe control action is on the flanks until the weather changes or the fuel supply lessens.

Text alerts from the Lake Ozark Fire Protection District

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JOIN US AT THE 2013 POLAR BEAR PLUNGE

Saturday - February 23, 2013
This "unbearable" event is a unique opportunity to show your bravery as you support local Special Olympics athletes by walking, running or crawling into the frigid winter waters. Proceeds benefit Special Olympics Missouri’s year-round program of sports training and competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.
http://somo.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1036883

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Demolition of the existing station's floor and footings to make way for the new station.

  • 2-24-14-1
  • 12-30-13-1
  • 12-30-13-2
  • 12-30-13-3a
  • 12-30-13-4
  • 12-30-13-5
  • 1-23-14-1
  • 1-23-14-2
  • 1-23-14-3
  • 1-23-14-4
  • 1-23-14-5
  • 2-10-14-1
  • 2-10-14-2
  • 2-10-14-3
 

 

 

                                                                      
Lake Ozark Fire Protection District
1767 Bagnell Dam Blvd
Lake Ozark, MO 65049
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